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Smoked fish kedgeree recipe

Smoked fish kedgeree recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Seafood
  • Fish
  • White fish
  • Haddock
  • Smoked haddock

This lightly spiced Anglo-Indian rice dish is an absolute classic and makes a great one-pot lunch or supper.

25 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 350g skinless smoked haddock fillet (preferably undyed)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 tbsp chopped fresh parsley plus 2 stalks
  • 600ml vegetable stock, hot
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 15g butter
  • 300g basmati rice
  • 1/2 tsp curry powder or paste
  • 1/4 tsp garam masala
  • 1/4 tsp ground coriander
  • 150g frozen peas, thawed
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • TO GARNISH
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, quartered
  • sprigs of fresh parsley

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:35min

  1. Put the haddock in a saucepan, cutting to fit if necessary. Add the bay leaf and parsley stalks, then pour in the stock. Cover and simmer gently for 7–8 minutes, until the fish flakes easily. Remove the fish using a fish slice and set aside. Reserve the cooking liquid and bay leaf.
  2. Heat the oil and butter in the rinsed out pan until melted, then add the rice and stir until coated in the mixture. Add the spices and cook over a low heat for 2 minutes, stirring all the time.
  3. Make up the reserved cooking liquid to 600ml with boiling water, then pour this stock into the pan. Add the bay leaf, cover and simmer for 10 minutes, adding a little more boiling water if needed. Stir in the peas, cover again and continue cooking for 2–3 minutes or until the rice is tender and the liquid has been absorbed.
  4. Meanwhile, break the fish into large flakes, discarding any skin and bones. Gently stir into the hot rice with the chopped parsley, season with pepper and heat gently for about 30 seconds to ensure the dish is piping hot. Remove the bay leaf.
  5. Transfer the kedgeree to a warmed serving dish or individual plates and serve garnished with egg quarters and sprigs of parsley.

COOK SMART

*If you don't have garam masala or ground coriander to hand, simply use an extra 1/2 tsp of your favourite curry powder or paste.
*Naan bread, spread with garlic butter and baked in a moderate oven for 5–6 minutes, makes a great accompaniment. Cut into strips to serve.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)

Reviews in English (2)

Really easy to make. Superb taste. Quantities were a bit light for my 3 strapping teenage sons but everyone enjoyed it.-20 May 2013

Coming back to make this again. didn't review last time, but it is excellent. Grew up eating a terrble version of kedgeree using canned tuna and evaporated milk. We thought it was terrific- and it was one of the few dishes my Mom could cook. I'm in the states, and nice smoked fish is hard to come by. I use cod cut into two inch chunks and marinate it in a little bit of hickory smoke liquid for a few hours. Works well for my purposes (though I wish I had haddock-but way too expensive). It is amazing how well it works. I usually make a curry sauce with coconut milk or canned milk, cook the rice add the peas and hard boiled eggs. I disperse the uncooked fish throughout, then put in oven to bake for about 20 mins or until heated through and the fish are cooked. So I tweak this for us. But it is an excellent jumping off point for an excellent kedgeree. But then I have never had the real deal, so how would I know? But hey, we all love this dish, so that is most important.-20 Jan 2018


  • 40g/1½oz butter
  • 2 tsp garam masala
  • 250g/9oz basmati rice
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 lemon, zest only
  • 2 mild green chillies, seeded, chopped
  • 1 small piece fresh root ginger, peeled, finely grated
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 375ml/13fl oz light chicken stock
  • 400g/14oz un-dyed smoked haddock fillet, boned, skin on, cut into 4 equal portions
  • 2 free-range eggs, hard-boiled, peeled, grated
  • 2 spring onions, trimmed, finely sliced
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander , to serve

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4.

Melt the butter in a large, heavy-based lidded casserole dish. Add the garam masala and allow to sizzle gently for a moment or two. Tip in the rice and stir around until the grains are well coated with this spicy butter.

Add the bay leaf, lemon zest, green chilli, ginger and a touch of salt and freshly ground black pepper. Pour over the stock, bring up to a simmer, then lay the fish on top, gently submerging it under the surface. Put on the lid and cook in the oven for 15-20 minutes.

Remove from the oven, then leave to stand for 5-7 minutes without removing the lid this is important - it allows the rice to finish cooking.

Take off the lid, remove the skin from the fish and immediately add the chopped egg, onions and coriander and, using two forks, gently mix the rice, while also breaking the fish into flakes and mixing everything else in as you go. Remove the bay leaf and cover with a tea towel, clamp on the lid, and leave for a further five minutes to remove any excess steam. Mix again lightly.

Serve directly from the dish onto hot plates and squeeze over a little lemon juice.

Recipe Tips

Use one and a half times the amount of liquid to the weight of the rice for the perfect pilaf. Test the strength of the chillies by rubbing your finger along them and tasting. If you like your food hot, you could add the seeds from one or two of the chopped chillies to add kick, depending on their strength and your taste.


Kedgeree

For the rice, heat 2 tbsp vegetable oil in a large, lidded pan, add 1 finely chopped large onion, then gently fry for 5 mins until softened but not coloured.

Add 1 tsp ground coriander, 1 tsp ground turmeric and 2 tsp curry powder, season with salt, then continue to fry until the mix starts to go brown and fragrant about 3 mins.

Add 300g rinsed easy-cook long grain rice and stir in well. Add 600ml water, stir, then bring to the boil. Reduce to a simmer, then cover for 10 mins.

Take off the heat and leave to stand, covered, for 10-15 mins more. The rice will be perfectly cooked if you do not lift the lid before the end of the cooking.

Meanwhile, put 300g skin-on undyed smoked haddock fillet and 2 bay leaves in a frying pan, cover with 300ml milk, then poach for 10 mins until the flesh flakes. Remove from the milk, peel away the skin, then flake the flesh into thumb-sized pieces.

Place 4 eggs in a pan, cover with water, bring to the boil, then reduce to a simmer. Leave for 4½-5 mins, plunge into cold water, then peel and cut the eggs into quarters.

Gently mix the fish, eggs, a handful each of chopped parsley and coriander, and rice together in the pan. Serve hot, sprinkled with a few extra herbs.


Kedgeree

Though kedgeree is considered a traditional British food, this smoked fish dish actually originated in India. Kedgeree began its life as khichari, an Indian dish of rice and lentils, but slowly transformed into the current dish during the time of the British Raj.

Looking at a Kedgeree recipe, it is easy to see the Indian influence with curry and rice, along with the British flair from the eggs and smoked fish. Kedgeree is considered a breakfast dish but can be enjoyed as a light lunch or dinner.


British Bites: Kedgeree

Rice, curry, smoked haddock, and eggs—at first glance these ingredients seem a tad odd, but if you've ever had a steaming plate of kedgeree, you know that it all comes together like a poem in your mouth. This dish derives from the Indian influence on British cuisine. A few big scoops of curry powder are incorporated with some classic British ingredients to make a dish that is exciting and somehow soothing at the same time. This jumbled dish is most often served as breakfast. Get the recipe here >>

Rice, curry, smoked haddock, and eggs—at first glance these ingredients seem a tad odd, but if you've ever had a steaming plate of kedgeree, you know that it all comes together like a poem in your mouth. This dish derives from the Indian influence on British cuisine. A few big scoops of curry powder are incorporated with some classic British ingredients to make a dish that is exciting and somehow soothing at the same time.

This jumbled dish is most often served as breakfast, and is not too far from a big mess of "clean out the fridge" scrambled eggs that are often a part of my weekend mornings. This dish can be served either hot or cold, which makes it an interesting addition to a potluck brunch, or a bag lunch for work or school. As with many dishes, if you give it time to sit the flavors have the chance to meld, making the dish even better.

Using smoked haddock is delicious, and very traditional, but it can be difficult to find. If you happen to have a lovely piece of salmon, or even some fresh haddock, feel free to substitute it. And if you're at all like me and always end up ordering way too much rice with your Asian delivery, this is a great place to use it. Don't be too concerned if you use regular rice instead of jasmine, the dish will turn out just fine.


Smoked haddock kedgeree recipe

This classic Anglo-Indian dish derives from the popular kichri &ndash rice and lentils cooked together with ginger, chillies and onions. The British adapted the dish by adding eggs and smoked fish and it then made its way back here as a breakfast dish. Often the eggs are just boiled and flaked into therice, but here we have also poached one and placed it on top. It makes for an excellent brunch dish, too.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2.5 cm piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 green chillies, finely chopped
  • 1 tomato, deseeded and chopped into 1cm dice
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 2 tbsp fish stock or water
  • 500 g basmati rice, boiled
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, the whites chopped and yolk discarded
  • 150 g undyed smoked haddock, poached in a little milk and flaked
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander leaves and stalks
  • 30 g butter
  • 2 tbsp single cream
  • 1 pinch freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2.5 cm piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 green chillies, finely chopped
  • 1 tomato, deseeded and chopped into 1cm dice
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 2 tbsp fish stock or water
  • 17.6 oz basmati rice, boiled
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, the whites chopped and yolk discarded
  • 5.3 oz undyed smoked haddock, poached in a little milk and flaked
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander leaves and stalks
  • 1.1 oz butter
  • 2 tbsp single cream
  • 1 pinch freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2.5 cm piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 green chillies, finely chopped
  • 1 tomato, deseeded and chopped into 1cm dice
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 2 tbsp fish stock or water
  • 17.6 oz basmati rice, boiled
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, the whites chopped and yolk discarded
  • 5.3 oz undyed smoked haddock, poached in a little milk and flaked
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander leaves and stalks
  • 1.1 oz butter
  • 2 tbsp single cream
  • 1 pinch freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 l water
  • 2 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 eggs
  • 1.8 pints water
  • 2 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 eggs
  • 4.2 cups water
  • 2 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 eggs

Details

  • Cuisine: English
  • Recipe Type: Breakfast
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Preparation Time: 10 mins
  • Cooking Time: 25 mins
  • Serves: 4

Step-by-step

  1. Heat the oil in a pan, add the onion and sauté over a medium heat for 4-6 minutes until it is translucent. Add the ginger, chillies and tomato, stirring to mix well. Add the turmeric and cook for a minute and then add the fish stock. Tip in the boiled rice, then add the salt, fold in the chopped egg white and flaked haddock and sprinkle in the coriander. Gently stir in the butter and cream and remove from the heat.
  2. For the poached egg, take a shallow pan and pour in the water, add the vinegar and salt and simmer. Now carefully break the eggs and simmer slowly till the whites coagulate and a thin film is formed on the yolk in the centre. You must take care that, at no stage, the water in the pan comes to boiling point, as it will ruin the eggs.
  3. Divide the kedgeree into bowls, grind a twist or two of freshly milled pepper, top with the poached eggs and serve immediately.

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SMOKED FISH KEDGEREE

his is our take on a classic English breakfast/brunch dish, using amazing New Zealand smoked fish along with the more traditional curry-spiced rice and boiled eggs.

Method

Melt butter in a large saucepan over a medium heat, add onion and cook gently for 5 mins or until softened but not browned. Stir in cardamom pods, turmeric, curry powder, cinnamon stick and bay leaves, cook for a further minute.

Add in rice and stir well to coat in the spiced butter. Pour in stock and stir to release any rice from the bottom of the pan, bring to a boil. Cover with a lid and reduce heat to low and leave to cook gently for 12 mins.

Meanwhile, bring a small saucepan filled with water to a boil over a high heat then add the eggs and hard-boil for 8 minutes. Drain eggs and refresh in cold water, then peel and coarsely chop.

Uncover rice and remove bay leaves, cinnamon stick and cardamom pods. Gently stir in flaked smoked fish and chopped eggs, cover and leave to stand for 2-3 mins off the heat or until fish has warmed through. Gently stir in 3⁄4 of the parsley, and season to taste.

Serve with remaining parsley scattered over and garnish with chilli rings and lemon wedges.

Ingredients

50g butter
1 medium onion, finely chopped
3 cardamom pods, split open
1⁄4 tsp turmeric
2 teaspoons Farro mild curry powder
1 small cinnamon stick
2 fresh bay leaves
450g basmati rice
1 litre Foundation Foods chicken or fish stock
200g Ahia smoked hoki or blue moki, flaked, skin and bones discarded
4 eggs
3 tablespoons fresh Italian parsley leaves, roughly chopped
1 mild red chilli, sliced into rings
1 lemon, cut into wedges, to garnish


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Graeme Taylor spices his smoked haddock kedgeree recipe with a masala mix of cumin, coriander seed, Kashmiri chilli powder and turmeric – a cut above the average curry powder normally used in this iconic brunch dish. Graeme serves his with poached eggs instead of hard boiled for the added luxury of an oozing yolk.

All through this Scottish Year of Food and Drink I find myself reflecting on the Scottish cuisine and how it has become the food that we now know. As a land that is steeped in myth and legend, and a cuisine that has many influences from those whose hands have touched the country, kedgeree is a dish that reflects all those aspects succinctly. Therefore as Scotland looks to celebrate her food I am revisiting a story and recipe of this age-old dish with a cosmopolitan take.

Smoked haddock has long been a staple of the Scottish diet, certainly when I was growing up we’d frequently see the shiny yellow-brown hue of cold smoked haddock disappearing into a sea of milk to poach, served simply with potatoes and a green vegetable. Another incarnation of the smoked haddock hails most famously from the town of Arbroath, where haddock is hot smoked in open barrels to produce Arbroath smokies. These can then be kept and eaten cold but there’s nothing quite like the oily sweet smokiness of a hot freshly produced smoky. But typically, as with a lot of Scottish cuisine, smoking does not appear to hail from the indigenous people of the land, with much evidence suggesting it was introduced by the conquering Vikings during the 400 years when large swathes of Scotland was ruled by the Norsemen.

Similarly spice isn’t indigenous to Scotland but the Scots have welcomed it with open arms. Legend has it that a Scottish regiment brought back curry spices from the Indian sub-continent in the time of the British Raj and that kedgeree was the result of tinkering with a dish they’d seen there at the time. There is probably an element of truth in this, how much truth probably depends on your desire for casting a wistfully romantic eye to the past.

What is true is that all over the sub-continent you will find a dish with many regional variations of rice, daals and spice, but never fish, called khitchri. With this in mind I decided that I wanted to make a spice blend that would perfectly marry the sweet smokiness of the haddock in kedgeree with an authentic south Asian flavour far removed from the generic curry powder of many a kedgeree recipe. Sumayya Usmani of mytamarindkitchen.com gave great assistance guiding me towards cumin, coriander and chilli as a simple spice blend that the haddock would accentuate but not drown in. I also added a little turmeric as I like the colour it gives the dish and opted for Kashmiri chilli, again because of the wonderful colour it gives when cooking and the aroma that it fills the kitchen with.

Note: Traditionally hard boiled eggs are added but I prefer to see the yolk of the poached egg run into the smoky goodness below.