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Bulleit Proof Manhattan Cocktail

Bulleit Proof Manhattan Cocktail



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On the menu at the renowned Michael's Genuine Food & Drink in Miami, this reinvented classic is a must-try for bourbon fanatics. The recipe cleverly replaces the typical sweet vermouth with the deep sweet-and-sour flavor of cherries, balanced by the spicy undertone of fresh rosemary and warmth of good bourbon.

Ingredients

  • 1 8 ounce jar Amarena Italian cherries or quality jarred cherries in syrup
  • 3 rosemary sprigs
  • 4 ounces Bulleit bourbon
  • 1/2 ounce lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup water
  • Ice

Nutritional Facts

Servings1

Calories Per Serving449

Folate equivalent (total)28µg7%


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Manhattan

The Manhattan was the most famous cocktail in the world shortly after it was invented in New York City’s Manhattan Club, some time around 1880 (as the story goes). Over the years, the whiskey classic has dipped in and out of fashion before finding its footing as one of the cornerstones of the craft cocktail renaissance.

Amazingly, the drink that socialites tipped to their lips in the 19th century looks and tastes pretty much the same as the one served today at any decent cocktail bar. The Manhattan’s mix of American whiskey and Italian vermouth, enlivened with a few dashes of aromatic bitters, is timeless and tasty—the very definition of what a cocktail should be.

Early versions call for rye, with its spicier, edgier profile. Purists claim that it’s not a Manhattan without it, but who has ever had fun drinking with a purist? We find that bourbon creates a beautiful, if mellower, drink. And while Angostura bitters are a must in any variation, a single dash of orange bitters helps brighten the cocktail’s edges, bringing the whiskey and vermouth together seamlessly, while the brandied cherry garnish lends a touch of sweetness.

Despite all of the Manhattan’s unassailable qualities, bartenders and enterprising drinkers have still found ways to tweak the recipe into myriad variations. If you split the vermouth between sweet and dry, you get the Perfect Manhattan. If you switch the ratios to make vermouth the star, you’ve stirred up a Reverse Manhattan. The Rob Roy is essentially a scotch Manhattan. And then you’ve got other named-for-New York cocktails like the Red Hook and Brooklyn, which employ their own twists to take the drink in new directions.

But regardless of all the options, there is only one classic Manhattan: two parts whiskey, one part sweet vermouth and bitters. Mix one (stirred, never shaken), and you’ll see why this storied drink has remained a favorite since its inception.


How to Make the Perfect Manhattan—3 Different Ways

Jason O'Bryan

Jason O'Bryan's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Brent Hofacker/Shutterstock

It may feel a little adolescent, but there are still some things, in adult life, that are cool. The Manhattan is one of those things.

It&rsquos not cool like a fast car or a devil-may-care attitude, nor is it particularly trendy. It&rsquos not TikTok cool. It&rsquos cool the way your Grandpa was cool, the way good jazz and Paul Newman and a three-piece suit are cool. Old School Cool, less in veneration than timelessness. You could dislike Negronis or not much care for Margaritas, and it won&rsquot raise an eyebrow, but if you don&rsquot like Manhattans, the general conclusion will be that the problem is with you.

Related

It&rsquos quite the comeback story for what was, in the 󈨊s and 󈨔s, widely seen as a stodgy artifact of a bygone era. A rye whiskey, vermouth and bitters cocktail that is garnished with a cherry was, after all, of limited use to an entire generation who couldn&rsquot find rye whiskey, whose garbage vermouth had spoiled long ago, whose bottles of bitters were crusted shut, and whose incandescent &ldquomaraschino cherries&rdquo had more in common with their own packaging material than an actual living cherry. These were dark times in the drinking world. Then about 30 years ago some bartenders rediscovered fresh ingredients and a movement took root, first slowly and then it seems all at once, and cocktails rose, Phoenix-like, from their own ashes. And there, on the right-hand throne of cocktail culture itself, sits the Manhattan, once again.

There&rsquos good reason for this: A well-made Manhattan is a sublime thing. It&rsquos strong but not bracing, smooth but not boring and rich but not sweet&mdashsome kind of needle-threading magic that is rare to the point of unique in the cocktail pantheon. Additionally, as it is served up (without ice) and contains two ingredients with high aromatic complexity, it changes as it warms, evolving, inviting you at any moment to experience it nearly anew. It is, when properly constructed, irrepressibly charming.

The problem, though, is unlike the Negroni or Margarita, it&rsquos pretty easy to screw up the Manhattan. Its pedestal of greatness is narrow, and almost any step in the wrong direction&mdashwrong or overly oxidized vermouth, wrong rye, wrong vermouth-rye combination, over-stirring, etc.&mdashdrops it from great down to just OK, and a just OK Manhattan is so disappointing.

If you&rsquove never had a great Manhattan, you might wonder what I&rsquom prattling on about. Well, try one or all of these recipes and you’ll get it.

Start your Manhattan off right. Photo: courtesy Heaven Hill

Professional

For this cocktail and the additional recipes below, add ingredients to mixing glass, stir on ice for 15 seconds (small ice) to 30 seconds (bigger ice). Strain into stemmed cocktail glass and garnish with a quality cocktail cherry, an orange peel or nothing at all.

This is what you&rsquoll get as a default in most cocktail bars: a punchy, 100 proof Kentucky-style rye with an ounce of quality vermouth. Rittenhouse and its competitors (Old Overholt Bonded or Wild Turkey 101) aren&rsquot perfect here, and a lot of vermouths just don&rsquot work with them, but Cocchi Vermouth di Torino holds its own beautifully with a kiss of vanilla sweetness and complexity. In fact, if you don&rsquot know in advance what vermouth your rye is optimized for, Cocchi is as safe an all-around bet as you can get.

Luxury Version

Both Michter&rsquos Rye and Punt e Mes are exceptional Manhattan ingredients, and never more so than when they&rsquore together. Michter&rsquos has a caramel richness, a toasted-oak sweet spice, that sings with just about any vermouth you could throw at it. Especially radiant is the dark cherry and chocolate richness and incredible depth of Punt e Mes, the other most all-purpose Manhattan vermouth.

Eccentric Edition

Rye tends to be the better call, but bourbon can play in this space too. It is true that a sweeter bourbon will lack the balancing spice required and can end up a bit flat, but high-rye bourbons, like Bulleit, can be quite good. Of all the vermouth&rsquos tested, Bulleit Bourbon found its other half in Lustau Vermut, a sherry-based sweet vermouth that offers texture, depth, and an echo of the nutty quality for which sherry is famous.


MONTE CARLO Manhattan variation | Whiskey Cocktail

The Monte Carlo is a variation on the Manhattan and was featured in David Embury’s 1948 The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. It is on the sweeter side but these ratios do showcase the Benedictine liqueurs sweet, honeyed spice..
If you prefer a dryer, whiskey-forward drink then the Benedictine measurement can be halved..
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BUY THE BACKBAR: http://bit.ly/buy-a-bottle.
*****.
INGREDIENTS.
60ml Rye Whiskey (2 oz).
30ml Benedictine Liqueur (1 oz) OR 15ml for a dryer, less sweet version.
1 Dash of Angostura Bitters.
METHOD.
1. Combine the 3 ingredients into your mixing glass.
2. Stir for 20-30 seconds.
3. Strain over fresh ice into a double old fashioned.
4. Garnish with a twist of lemon.
Music by Gurty Beats Cold Snap: https://gurtybeats.bandcamp.com/track/cold-snap-instrumental-by-gurtybeats

Video taken from the channel: Steve the Bartender


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OLD FORESTER RYE SAZERAC

“Old Forester Rye makes a perfect base for the classic Sazerac due to its high proof and distinctive tasting notes. The proprietary mashbill, with its generous portion of malted barley (20%), establishes elements of magnolia, anise, and lemon—making for a cohesive landscape to build this classic cocktail upon.” —Jackie Zykan, master taster at Old Forester

Ingredients:

6 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters

Method: Rinse a chilled old-fashioned glass with the absinthe, add crushed ice, and set it aside. Stir the remaining ingredients over ice and set it aside. Discard the ice and any excess absinthe from the prepared glass, and strain the drink into the glass. Add the lemon peel for garnish.

KILBEGGAN SMALL BATCH RYE OLD FASHIONED

“Kilbeggan Small Batch Rye is made up of malted and unmalted barley as well as thirty percent rye. So its rye content is smaller in comparison to U.S rye whiskeys—and because if this, it allows for the green apple, ginger, and clove notes from the barley to stand up in an Old Fashioned. The soft rye spice is discoverable in every sip and a simple sprig of rosemary makes for the perfect garnish.” —Michael Egan, U.S. Brand Ambassador at Kilbeggan Distilling Co.

Ingredients:

2 parts Kilbeggan Small Batch Rye Irish Whiskey

2 dashes aromatic bitters

1 bar spoon of simple syrup or cinnamon syrup

Method: Combine ingredients in a mixing glass, add ice, and stir briefly. Serve over a large ice cube and garnish with a sprig of rosemary.

FLIP FLOP

“The Flip Flop is a whole egg cocktail. And it’s always a great cold-weather drink. The egg delivers great texture and depth and gives the bartender the ability to add more decadent ingredients.” —Brendan Bartley, head bartender and beverage director at Bathtub Gin

Ingredients:

Method: Crack egg into shaker. Add all other ingredients to shaker. Shake all ingredients vigorously. Add ice and repeat shake. Double strain ingredients into a chilled stemmed glass. Grate cinnamon on top.

YE OLDE MANHATTAN

“Our Ye Olde Manhattan is a riff on the world’s most famous whiskey cocktail. We drive a number of classic cocktails, so we wanted to create something similar but unique to us. It is very soft, elegant: a light style of Manhattan. We add our own small embellishments such as Otto’s vermouth, Madeira wine, Frangelico, and a few dashes of sandalwood bitters. It still shows all of the hallmarks of a classic Manhattan, but it is very unique to the townhouse. Madeira is an interesting addition because it has such a long history in the United States, hence the name ‘Ye Olde.’ It was particularly popular in South Carolina as it was one of the first fortified wines to come into the country. I thought it would be nice to pay homage to that because it is an ingredient you don’t see very often in cocktails. It adds an oxidized nuttiness to the finished drink. And Madeira can be found in most high-end wine shops.” —Naren Young, bar director at The Fat Radish Popup at The Orchard Townhouse

Ingredients:

3 dashes sandalwood bitters

Method: Stir and strain into a rocks glass and garnish with 3 skewered cherries.

APPLE PIE SPRITZ

“The Apple Pie Spritz is a great cocktail. The spicy notes from the Redemption rye mixed with the fresh apple cider create the ultimate mix of flavors topped off with some Josh Cellars prosecco for a little added fizz.” Matt Klette, brand ambassador at Redemption Rye

Ingredients:

Josh Cellars Prosecco, to top

Method: Add ingredients other than prosecco to flute and lightly stir to mix ingredients. Top with prosecco and garnish with expressed lemon peel.

PINTADAS UNIDAS

“We are deep into sweater weather, where all I want to do is cuddle with a boozy contemplative cocktail. This riff on an Old Fashioned is just that: a perfect nightcap to curl up and think over.” —Ivy Mix, author of Spirits of Latin America and cofounder at Leyenda, New York City

Ingredients:

1.5 parts El Tesoro añejo tequila

1 tsp. macadamia nut orgeat

Maldon smoked sea salt, for garnish

Melted Jacques Torres Midnight Chocolate, for garnish

Method: Stir, pour into a rocks glass that has been painted with Jacques Torres Midnight chocolate with a half rim of maldon smoked sea salt—over a large clear cube.

BRASS KNUCKLE

“This is our take on a Manhattan, featuring a bit of Cynar instead of straight sweet vermouth. For me, the Cynar gives it a depth of flavor that is otherwise missing in a Manhattan. It’s got a bit more spice, a bit more bitterness to balance the sweetness from the vermouth, and the cocktail cherries are a delicious treat after you finish the drink!” —Gavin Humes, food and beverage director at Scratch Restaurants

Ingredients:

0.5 oz. Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth

Method: Add all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice. Stir until chilled. Strain into a coupe. Finish with cocktail cherries.

BULLEIT PROOF OLD FASHIONED

“A drink that is as bold as its name would suggest, the Bulleit Proof Old Fashioned bases itself on the Bulleit Rye Whiskey—a spicy rye whiskey. Building upon it are easily available ingredients that serve to enhance the drink and turn it into something incredible. An apple-infused syrup grants some sweetness and freshness a (muddled) sliced orange adds a citrus flavor and black walnut bitters grant the drink a more grounded, nutty profile—to stabilize everything into a masterpiece that is smooth and bears a notable smokiness at the end.” —Donny Largotta, beverage director at The Chester at The Gansevoort Hotel (Meatpacking)

Ingredients:

2 dashes black walnut bitters

Rosemary sprig, for garnish

Maraschino cherries, for garnish

Method: Stirred and strain over 1 large ice cube in a rocks glass. Garnished with a skewer of maraschino cherries, apple slice, and rosemary sprigs.

BOOTLEGGER’S WARD 8

“This recipe was born out of the Prohibition and the original recipe calls for Grenadine. (But to give it our own twist, we use pomegranate molasses.) Then, add the fresh orange juice, simple syrup, and some fresh lime juice. As a base ingredient, we use the Templeton Rye 4 Year, which was charred in American oak barrels and gives it a good flavor. Shake it up and serve!” —Goran Remes, former bartender at Rye House, New York City

Ingredients:

Bar spoon Pomegranate Molasses

Method: Shake and strain into a coupe. Garnish with a brandy cherry.

EIGHT O’CLOCK HOWELL

“Last April, every night at 8:00 p.m, the howling would begin. It was a way for Denver residents to honor our healthcare workers during the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic. The 8:00-hour was the scheduled shift change at most Denver-area hospitals and this was Denver’s way to recognize and thank them. So, we made the Eight O’Clock Howell simple to make for all the new home bartenders that were creating cocktails during lockdown. Just four easy-to-find ingredients and standard cocktail-making equipment. The howling in Denver stopped a while ago, but we’re still drinking this. Turns out, this cocktail works great this season too! The grain-forward flavors of our San Luis Valley Rye shine in this simple but bold cocktail.” —Steve Kurowski, marketing director at Laws Whiskey House

Ingredients:

0.25 oz. Dolin sweet vermouth

Maraschino cherry, for garnish

Method: Mix all ingredients in a mixing glass filled with ice. Stir and strain into a coupe or martini glass. Garnish with maraschino cherry.

COLD FASHIONED

“I love to add Mr. Black to classic cocktails because it provides depth and delivers a great coffee twist to your cocktail creation. One of my favorite examples is the Cold Fashioned: Instead of the regular recipe where you use sugar, try using Mr. Black with your favorite rye whiskey—and you have an old fashioned with a kick, the perfect drink for the season.” —Martin Hudak, global coffee ambassador at Mr Black

Ingredients:

1 oz. Mr. Black Cold Brew Coffee Liqueur

Method: Stir and serve on the rocks. Garnish with orange slice or peel.

MANHATTAN IN FALL

“The Manhattan In Fall is a bit less whiskey forward compared to the original Manhattan recipe. Amaro brings a very herbal and earthy tone to the cocktail—and its dark color gives the cocktail a unique hue.” —Juan Fernandez, beverage director at The Ballantyne, A Luxury Collection Hotel, Charlotte, NC

Ingredients:

1 drop Crude Sycophant orange and fig bitters

Method: Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice, stir, strain into martini or coupe glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.

SHADOW & LIGHT

“It is a wonderful time for warm spices, orchard fruit, and smooth whiskey. As a pioneer in the early days of film, the director Dorothy Arzner knew all about the inseparable connection between light and darkness, as well as the emotional impact it had on the audience. Her namesake rye, from Francis Ford Coppola’s line of ‘Great Women Spirits,’ forms the foundation of this nuanced cocktail, which cools the body with apple cider and lemon, while it warms the soul with amaro and chai tea syrup.” —Mark Tubridy, bartender at The 21 Club and cocktail consultant/educator

Ingredients:

*Chai Tea Syrup: Bring 1 cup of water to a rolling boil. Remove from heat, add 4 Chai tea bags (or loose-leaf Chai), and steep for 5 minutes. Remove the bags (or strain out the leaves) and pour tea into a saucepan over low-medium heat. Stir in 1 cup of sugar until it dissolves completely and then remove syrup from heat and let cool before bottling and refrigerating. (Yields 1.5 cups.)

Method: Combine all ingredients in a mixing tin add ice, shake vigorously, and strain into a highball glass over fresh ice. Garnish with star anise and three fanned apple slices.


How to Make the Perfect Manhattan—3 Different Ways

Jason O'Bryan

Jason O'Bryan's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Brent Hofacker/Shutterstock

It may feel a little adolescent, but there are still some things, in adult life, that are cool. The Manhattan is one of those things.

It&rsquos not cool like a fast car or a devil-may-care attitude, nor is it particularly trendy. It&rsquos not TikTok cool. It&rsquos cool the way your Grandpa was cool, the way good jazz and Paul Newman and a three-piece suit are cool. Old School Cool, less in veneration than timelessness. You could dislike Negronis or not much care for Margaritas, and it won&rsquot raise an eyebrow, but if you don&rsquot like Manhattans, the general conclusion will be that the problem is with you.

Related

It&rsquos quite the comeback story for what was, in the 󈨊s and 󈨔s, widely seen as a stodgy artifact of a bygone era. A rye whiskey, vermouth and bitters cocktail that is garnished with a cherry was, after all, of limited use to an entire generation who couldn&rsquot find rye whiskey, whose garbage vermouth had spoiled long ago, whose bottles of bitters were crusted shut, and whose incandescent &ldquomaraschino cherries&rdquo had more in common with their own packaging material than an actual living cherry. These were dark times in the drinking world. Then about 30 years ago some bartenders rediscovered fresh ingredients and a movement took root, first slowly and then it seems all at once, and cocktails rose, Phoenix-like, from their own ashes. And there, on the right-hand throne of cocktail culture itself, sits the Manhattan, once again.

There&rsquos good reason for this: A well-made Manhattan is a sublime thing. It&rsquos strong but not bracing, smooth but not boring and rich but not sweet&mdashsome kind of needle-threading magic that is rare to the point of unique in the cocktail pantheon. Additionally, as it is served up (without ice) and contains two ingredients with high aromatic complexity, it changes as it warms, evolving, inviting you at any moment to experience it nearly anew. It is, when properly constructed, irrepressibly charming.

The problem, though, is unlike the Negroni or Margarita, it&rsquos pretty easy to screw up the Manhattan. Its pedestal of greatness is narrow, and almost any step in the wrong direction&mdashwrong or overly oxidized vermouth, wrong rye, wrong vermouth-rye combination, over-stirring, etc.&mdashdrops it from great down to just OK, and a just OK Manhattan is so disappointing.

If you&rsquove never had a great Manhattan, you might wonder what I&rsquom prattling on about. Well, try one or all of these recipes and you’ll get it.

Start your Manhattan off right. Photo: courtesy Heaven Hill

Professional

For this cocktail and the additional recipes below, add ingredients to mixing glass, stir on ice for 15 seconds (small ice) to 30 seconds (bigger ice). Strain into stemmed cocktail glass and garnish with a quality cocktail cherry, an orange peel or nothing at all.

This is what you&rsquoll get as a default in most cocktail bars: a punchy, 100 proof Kentucky-style rye with an ounce of quality vermouth. Rittenhouse and its competitors (Old Overholt Bonded or Wild Turkey 101) aren&rsquot perfect here, and a lot of vermouths just don&rsquot work with them, but Cocchi Vermouth di Torino holds its own beautifully with a kiss of vanilla sweetness and complexity. In fact, if you don&rsquot know in advance what vermouth your rye is optimized for, Cocchi is as safe an all-around bet as you can get.

Luxury Version

Both Michter&rsquos Rye and Punt e Mes are exceptional Manhattan ingredients, and never more so than when they&rsquore together. Michter&rsquos has a caramel richness, a toasted-oak sweet spice, that sings with just about any vermouth you could throw at it. Especially radiant is the dark cherry and chocolate richness and incredible depth of Punt e Mes, the other most all-purpose Manhattan vermouth.

Eccentric Edition

Rye tends to be the better call, but bourbon can play in this space too. It is true that a sweeter bourbon will lack the balancing spice required and can end up a bit flat, but high-rye bourbons, like Bulleit, can be quite good. Of all the vermouth&rsquos tested, Bulleit Bourbon found its other half in Lustau Vermut, a sherry-based sweet vermouth that offers texture, depth, and an echo of the nutty quality for which sherry is famous.


We've partnered with the atomic lounge in alabama to make some fab concoctions you'll flip for.

Into The Great Wide Open

- 1 oz Cocchi Americano Bianco

Nightcap

Proof Mai-Tai

- 1 ½ oz Plantation Pineapple Rum

Smoke & Mirrors

- ¾ oz Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur

Lady In Red

Spice Girl

Secrets of the Beehive

- 1 ¼ oz Cathead Honeysuckle Vodka

- ¾ oz Barenjager Honey Liqueur

Border Dispute

- 1 oz Casamigos Reposado Tequila

- ½ oz Giffard Banane du Bresil

Brunch Punch

- 1 ¼ oz Cathead Pecan Vodka

- ¾ oz Fruitlab Hibiscus Liqueur

South by Southwest

- ¾ oz Ancho Reyes Chili Liqueur

Paris Fling

- ½ oz Peche de Vigne peach liqueur

The Woodsman

- ¾ oz Domaine de Canton ginger liqueur

Italian Frat Party

Chai Cup

-1 oz Unsweetened Chai Tea

Proof Pumpkin Punch

-1 cup Aperitivo Cocchi Americano

Players Club

- ¾ oz Fireball Cinnamon Whiskey

That's No Lady

- ¾ oz Godiva Chocolate Liqueur

Lodge Life

-½ oz DeKuyper White Creme
De Cacao

It's A Dry Heat

- 1 ½ oz Lunazul Reposado Tequila

- ¾ oz Ancho Verde Chile Poblano Liqueur

Blood & Sand & Proof

- 1 oz Dewar’s White Label Scotch

- ¾ oz Heering Cherry Liqueur

¡Viva La Revolución!

- ¾ oz Ancho Reyes Chile Liqueur

- ½ oz Giffard Banane du Bresil

Bloke Abroad

- 1 oz Aperitivo Cocchi Americano

- ½ oz St Germain Elderflower Liqueur

Candy Store

- 1 ½ oz Deep Eddy Grapefruit Vodka

- ½ oz Giffard Creme de Mure Blackberry Liqueur

All Business, No Play

- ¾ oz Rothman & Winter Apricot Liqueur

Paloma Roja

Honeysuckle Rose

- 1 ¼ oz Cathead Honeysuckle Vodka

- ½ oz St Germain Elderflower Liqueur

Winter Punch

- ½ cup Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur

- ½ cup St. Germain Elderflower Liqueur

- 1 cup Unsweetened Chai Tea


Virgin Manhattan

Steering clear of alcoholic beverages doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the highlights of classic cocktails like the Manhattan. Melding bitters with non-alcoholic wine, vanilla extract, and apple juice closely mimics the popular beverage. The bitters add complexity to this mocktail while the vanilla extract takes place of the whiskey. As for the zero-proof wine and apple juice combo, it is used in place of sweet vermouth. The end result is a multidimensional mocktail that is potent and slightly bitter with herb and spice fueled undertones. Simply mix, stir, strain and you’re done! Along with being delicious, this alcohol-free version is a bit sweeter making it much more approachable for those whose palates aren’t as keenly honed. Try pairing this virgin Manhattan with a steak simply seasoned with coarse salt and black pepper on a cozy evening in or make virgin manhattans for a crowd accompanied by fig and arugula flatbreads if you’re playing host

Virgin Manhattan Ingredients

2 dashes Angostura bitters

1 ½ ounces sweet non-alcoholic red wine

1 ounce non-alcoholic vanilla extract

1 ounce unsweetened apple juice

Directions for your Non-Alcoholic Manhattan

Add ice to a mixing glass with the bitters, non-alcoholic wine, vanilla extract, and apple juice. Stir.

Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Add the cherry and use a spoon to crush it against the side of the glass. Stir again.

Note: Although alcohol-based, two dashes of bitters contain trace amounts of alcohol meaning this mocktail is still considered non-alcoholic.

History of the Manhattan cocktail (before the Virgin)

History of the classy cocktail goes back to mid-1870s and early 1880s. It is said to be invented at a banquet hosted in honour of Samuel J. Tilden – who was the presidential candidate, by Jennie Jerome at the Manhattan Club in New York City. The banquet was a huge success and as a result the drink got its share of limelight too. In future get togethers, people requested for the same drink they had at the Manhattan Club and that’s how it got the name. Dr. Iain Marshall is said to be the one who concocted this drink. The cocktail is also mentioned in some prominent books of the century on various cocktail with details of their recipes.

Traditionally, the standard Manhattan cocktail is a mix of two parts of rye whiskey, one part of sweet vermouth, two dashes of bitters served with a cherry on top. However, people have changed the type of whiskey to suit their taste buds. Now, a variety of whiskey ranging from Bourbon to blended to Canadian to Tennessee are used for making this sultry iconic cocktail.

The cocktail is subjected to considerable number of variations. For instance, virgin Manhattan or a Manhattan mocktail is a non-alcoholic concoction for tea-totaler. The drink is not spiked by addition of any kind of whiskey or any other alcohol and is suitable for serving people of all ages. This mocktail is a mix of 2 parts of cranberry juice, 2 parts of orange juice, ½ teaspoon of cherry juice and ¼ teaspoon of lemon juice along with 2 dashes off orange bitters and served with a garnish of Maraschino cherry for that classic look.

In addition to these, there are other variations to these cocktails too that are made by altering the proportions or changing the alcohol type in it.


Variations on the Manhattan

The deceptively simple Manhattan has everything you need in a cocktail—richness and warmth from the whiskey, the sweetness and complexity of vermouth, and bitters to balance everything out. This trio of classic ingredients makes a perfect starting point for endless Manhattan variations here’s eight to start you off.

The Patriot

This version of the Manhattan stays true to the classic with Jim Beam rye whiskey and Angostura bitters. Get the recipe for The Patriot »

The Clint Eastwood

With slightly spicy Bulleit Bourbon and sweet Italian Amarena cherries, this take on the Manhattan is named for everyone’s favorite Spaghetti Western hero.

The Sidney Poitier

The Bahamian film star would be proud to have inspired this combination of Maker’s Mark bourbon, sweet vermouth and Aztec chocolate bitters. Get the recipe for The Sidney Poitier »

The Whiskey Rebellion

Bulleit rye, two kinds of vermouth, and West Indies orange bitters make up this riff on a Manhattan.

The Civil War

This riff on the Manhattan, composed of Portland-distilled Burnside bourbon, artichoke-flavored Cynar, and old fashioned bitters, uses unusual flavors as a complement to classic ones. See the recipe for The Civil War »

The Bittersweet Symphony

Barrel-aged for one month, this unique Manhattan recipe–with Portland’s Temperance Trader bourbon, two kinds of vermouth, and Angostura and Peychaud’s bitters–is worth the wait. See the recipe for The Bittersweet Symphony »

The Massamanhattan

Julia Travis, the beverage director at New York city restaurant Kin Shop, serves this variation on a Manhattan as a foil for the restaurant’s fiery Thai dishes. Inspired by the rich melange of spices of found in a massaman curry, it’s also perfect for sipping on a chilly evening.

Greenpoint

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